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The Hereford BID is run by Hereford BID Ltd; an independent not-for-profit company that is controlled by the private sector with up to 12 volunteer board members directing and advising the company in accordance with the business plan that we were voted in upon.

Representing 480 businesses in the City Centre, our remit is to deliver the business plan, and in doing so, identify, agree and deliver a timetable of schemes that will increase the appeal of our City, returning Hereford as a regional shopping and leisure destination, and importantly, a national tourist one too.

Business Improvement District

Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are a business led and controlled partnership covering a tightly defined geographic area that delivers an agreed set of services and projects. In reaching this point a BID will have set out in its business plan what it intends to do for that area.

BIDs began in the UK over a decade ago and now total over 200 nationwide. Typically setup for five years at a time, they currently represent almost 80,000 businesses and commercial properties, spread across industrial, commercial and mixed-use locations and operate against defined government legislation.

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BID information

You can find out Hereford BID’s catchment areas, inclusions, key facts and annual reports on this page.

 

Representing 480 businesses in the City Centre, our remit is to deliver the business plan, and in doing so, identify, agree and deliver a timetable of schemes that will increase the appeal of our City, returning Hereford as a regional shopping and leisure destination, and importantly, a national tourist one too.

The Hereford BID covers the entire City Centre and serves 480 businesses ranging from independents to national chains including pubs, clubs and cafes as well as car parks, banks and publicly owned buildings that are open to the public.The Hereford BID serves the following streets:

All Saints Street, Aubrey Street, Auctioneer Walk, Bastion Mews, Barroll Street, Bath Street (westside only), Bewell Square/ Bewell Street, Blackfriars Street (southside only), Blueschool Street, Brewers Passage, Bridge Street, Broad Street, Cathedral Close, Church Street, Commercial Road, Commercial Street, East Street, Eign Gate, Fryzers Court, Gaol Street, Garrick Lane, Gomond Street, High Street, High Town, King Street, Little Berrington Street, Mansion House Walk, Maylord Street, Newmarket Street, Offa Street, St John Street, St Nicholas Street, St. Owen Mews, St. Owen Street (odds 1-69 and evens 2-60), St. Peters Close, St. Peters Square, St. Peters Street, Station Approach, The Atrium, Trinity Square, Union Passage, Union Street, Wall Street, West Street, Widemarsh Street (odd nos. 1-71 inc. Garrick Car Park and Evens).

Hereford BID

  • In the UK, the majority of BIDs exist in town centres, however they are also in industrial, commercial and mixed-use locations.
  • The mechanism allows for a large degree of flexibility and as a result BIDs vary greatly in ‘shape’ and size.
  • The average size of is 300-400 hereditaments, with some of the smallest having fewer than 50 hereditaments and the largest at over 1,000.
  • Annual income is typically £200,000-£600,000 but can be as little as £50,000 per annum and over £2 million.
  • Legislation enabling the formation of BIDs was passed in 2003 in England and Wales (with subsequent regulations published in 2004 and 2005 respectively) and in 2006 in Scotland.
  • The first BID in England started in January 2005.
  • The first Scottish BID started in April 2008 as did the first Welsh BID.
  • First established in Canada and the US in the 1960s and now exist across the globe, including in South Africa, Germany, Japan, New Zealand and Australia.
  • Businesses decide and direct what they want for the area
  • Businesses are represented and have a voice in issues effecting the area
  • BID levy money is ring-fenced for use only in the BID area – unlike business rates which are paid in to, and redistributed, by government
  • Increased footfall
  • Improved staff retention
  • Business cost reduction
  • Area promotion
  • Facilitated networking opportunities with neighbouring businesses
  • Assistance in dealing with the Council, Police and other public bodies

OUR ANNUAL REPORTS

Importance of Hereford's BID

Hereford has seen a gradual decline as a destination for consumers over the last 20 years; whilst other destinations have prospered with the help of professional destination management and marketing, in Hereford we have (for the most part) done nothing.

Hereford needs professional destination management to restore it as a regional shopping and leisure destination as well as a national tourist one too. The days when you can leave such things in the hands of the local authority, or just to chance, are gone. The good news is that there is every reason to feel optimistic about the future of business in Hereford, despite current concerns we know many of you have.

With the added offerings provided by the opening of The Old Market, we have the foundations to bring footfall back to the area. Take The Old Market, add to it the varied retail offering in the historic town centre and hidden gems such as Church Street, and we’ve a message worth shouting about – a destination to sell. We’ve a destination that has enough to attract people for a full day out. We’ve now got a reason for people to come here and come regularly. Get them here, keep them here, and suddenly we’ve given the businesses in the area a good chance of taking some money.

To achieve this, we need to take the combined aspects of our business plan, from focusing on the visual attributes of the streets to understanding and meeting consumer expectations such as good sign posting; all must be combined and put together as one package that will enhance the reputation of Hereford, make us a strong retail and leisure draw, and see us thrive against a backdrop of declining high streets nationally. Even more encouraging is that none of what needs doing is especially difficult or complicated, it just needs doing. Without a Business Improvement District, who else is going to have the funds and expertise to make it happen?